The Howard Anderson Company was responsible for filming the special effects for “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” trying to bring cinematic-quality visual effects to television. They filmed the stationary 11-foot model of the Enterprise in front of a blue screen using a camera dolly on metal tracks. In an era before motion control photography was possible, Howard Anderson Jr and team would position the ship and inch slowly towards it, shooting one frame at a time. 

To complicate matters, the lighting rig needed to show the ship properly was prone to overheating the model. That meant that they had shoot a few frames, turn off the lights for twenty minutes or so, turn the lights on, expose a few more frames of film and then turn the lights off, ad nauseum. Nowadays, cold lights and fiber optics means that it’s much easier to shoot models, when models are even shot.

The Howard Anderson Company was responsible for filming the special effects for “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” trying to bring cinematic-quality visual effects to television. They filmed the stationary 11-foot model of the Enterprise in front of a blue screen using a camera dolly on metal tracks. In an era before motion control photography was possible, Howard Anderson Jr and team would position the ship and inch slowly towards it, shooting one frame at a time.

To complicate matters, the lighting rig needed to show the ship properly was prone to overheating the model. That meant that they had shoot a few frames, turn off the lights for twenty minutes or so, turn the lights on, expose a few more frames of film and then turn the lights off, ad nauseum. Nowadays, cold lights and fiber optics means that it’s much easier to shoot models, when models are even shot.