They Boldly Went is a tumblr dedicated to Star Trek: The Original Series, featuring photos, videos, art, books, reference material, comics and very (very) occasional looks at the reimagining helmed by J.J. Abrams and company. We welcome questions and do our best to answer them.

It is maintained by Kevin Church, who writes comics, occasionally talks about other people's work, takes pictures and does internet marketing for hire.

He is on Twitter (and Facebook, but he doesn't particularly like it, so don't stalk him.)

In addition to They Boldly Went, Kevin also maintains the Agreeable Comics tumblr, which acts as an adjunct to his small publishing concern and Disco Potential, which focuses on disco, house and synthpop music.

If you enjoy this blog, you may wish to check out Boldly Gone, an irregularly-updated Star Trek webcomic, written by Kevin and drawn by Bruce McCorkindale.

(Yes, Kevin likes talking about himself in the third person.)
You might be thinking about the fact that he became friends with Ben Finney while the latter was a Lieutenant who taught at the academy and JTK was a student. (“Court Martial.”)

You might be thinking about the fact that he became friends with Ben Finney while the latter was a Lieutenant who taught at the academy and JTK was a student. (“Court Martial.”)

At the beginning of Star Trek II, he was supervising command-track cadets at Starfleet Academy, but there’s no mention of him teaching prior to commanding Enterprise in any of the episodes or movies. (I’m sure there’s a novel that mentions it; those aren’t canon, so I’m gonna have to say that they never happened except in the hearts and minds of readers that enjoyed them.)

At the beginning of Star Trek II, he was supervising command-track cadets at Starfleet Academy, but there’s no mention of him teaching prior to commanding Enterprise in any of the episodes or movies. (I’m sure there’s a novel that mentions it; those aren’t canon, so I’m gonna have to say that they never happened except in the hearts and minds of readers that enjoyed them.)

What was Kirk's job in Starfleet before he became captain of a starship? Was the Enterprise his first command?
Asked by Anonymous

After attending Starfleet Academy and meeting Gary Mitchell (“Where No Man Has Gone Before”) and Finnegan (“Shore Leave”), Ensign James T. Kirk served on board the Republic with Ben Finney (“Court Martial”) and then the Farragut as a lieutenant. It was during his first deep-space assignment on board the Farragut that he encountered the cloud creature on Tycho IV (“Obsession”) and Tyree and the other residents of Neural (“A Private Little War”). He also assumed command of an unnamed ship prior to Enterprise (“Where No Man Has Gone Before”).

Kazuhiko Sano’s cover painting for the Spectra reprint of Jack C Haldeman II’s Perry’s Planet.

(You can buy it for me here.)

Kazuhiko Sano’s cover painting for the Spectra reprint of Jack C Haldeman II’s Perry’s Planet.

(You can buy it for me here.)

When Star Trek: The Motion Picture hit screens, it was at the time thought to be the most expensive motion picture ever made, with a total pricetag of $46 million. This included the costs for the never-made Star Trek: Phase II series along with multiple other attempts to bring the series to the big screen.

(In fact, Superman: The Movie ended up beating it with a final budget of $54 million, a fact that was kept hidden for several years after the movie’s release.)

When Star Trek: The Motion Picture hit screens, it was at the time thought to be the most expensive motion picture ever made, with a total pricetag of $46 million. This included the costs for the never-made Star Trek: Phase II series along with multiple other attempts to bring the series to the big screen.

(In fact, Superman: The Movie ended up beating it with a final budget of $54 million, a fact that was kept hidden for several years after the movie’s release.)

grayflannelsuit:

I guess Kirk kept Romulan Ale in the mini-fridge on board the Enterprise? I bet classictrek knows.

Of course he wouldn’t. It’s illegal!

grayflannelsuit:

I guess Kirk kept Romulan Ale in the mini-fridge on board the Enterprise? I bet classictrek knows.

Of course he wouldn’t. It’s illegal!

From People Magazine, January 1976.

For Star Trek Freaks, Chuck and Sandy Keep the Enterprise Sailing

Like other Star Trek addicts, Charles Weiss, 28, and Sandy Sarris, 29, were outraged when NBC grounded the Starship Enterprise and its celestial crew in 1968 after three years and 79 episodes.

Exchanging trivia and watching reruns weren’t enough for Weiss and Sarris, who had first met, appropriately, at a San Francisco Star Trek fan club meeting. Eight months ago they opened a hole-in-the-wall store in Berkeley, Calif., hoping to cash in on the national craze for Trek memorabilia. It worked. The Federation Trading Post (which, as any genuine Trekkie knows, is a market in space patronized by the Enterprise crew) has grossed over $75,000 and spawned a satellite store in midtown Manhattan.

A former industrial filmmaker in San Francisco (who had become a Trek fan in the Navy), Weiss discovered a year ago that he was allergic to film processing chemicals. Seeking a new career, he took out a loan to buy a videotape machine to show Trek episodes at local club meetings. Then he met Sandy. “I had a boyfriend but he hated Star Trek,” she says. “I used to hang up on him if he called during the show.”

Soon after moving in together, Sandy and Chuck organized a two-day Trek convention. To their astonishment, they had to turn away 1,000 fans for lack of space in a local high school. Those who got in bought every kind of Star Trek spinoff in sight, from T-shirts to paperbacks.

It was all the encouragement the two needed to go into business. On opening day three months later 1,500 people were lined up in front of the Federation Trading Post. Best-selling items are $2 posters of Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock, the starship’s pointy-eared first officer. Also popular are bumper stickers—”Star Trek Lives” and “Keep on Trekkin’ “—and buttons—”Beam me up” (a crew member’s request to enter the spaceship after being dematerialized). Many scientifically inclined Trekkers spend hours poring over the Starfleet Technical Manual, a bestseller at $6.95. It includes “documents” concerned with the founding of the United Federation of Planets plus diagrams of such essential equipment as a phaser (a weapon), a communicator (a sort of walkie-talkie and a homing device used to locate missing Enterprise members) and a tricorder (a modified computer). True Spock worshipers can also buy a pair of pointed foam rubber ear tips for $6.

Weiss characterizes his clients as “teenie-boppers intrigued by personalities, the technically minded fans interested in the hardware and those who are taken with the philosophy of the Enterprise crew.” Sandy adds another category: “Spockies—little girls just reaching puberty. To them Spock is the ultimate sex symbol, because he’s so aloof.”

Weiss and Sarris have long since paid off their original $2,500 bank loan, plus $1,000 for merchandise which Sandy had run up on her Master Charge. Weiss now looks forward to a national chain of science fiction stores, while Sandy labors over a grammar and syntax for Klingonii—the language spoken by the Klingons, deadly enemies of the Star Trek crew. Together they vow to fulfill the planet Vulcan motto promulgated by Mr. Spock: Live long and prosper.

by Dori Dominis

(Source: people.com)

Have you ever done anything Star Trek related for Halloween?
Asked by Anonymous

Surprisingly, I’m not a huge Halloween person and I really wasn’t, even as a kid. (Even if my husky physique belies my appreciation of Halloween candy.)

Thinking about it now, this indifference probably stems from an incident in the second or third grade where I tried to go as a Vulcan scientist and discovered that unless your mom spends a lot of money on rubber ears, they look terrible and also itch fiercely. 

(And you get laughed at by Amy Wolf and Tara Powers.)

Hailing Frequencies Open! Ask Star Trek Questions!


The communications officer is standing by for our regular Friday feature, Hailing Frequencies Open. Just use the Tumblr Ask function and send in your Star Trek questions, commentary, etc! I’ll pick the best of the bunch and respond to them!

Before you write in, though, you might want to check out the Trek Answers archive to see if your query has been addressed already!

Front and back covers for the first printing of The Fate of the Phoenix, the sequel to Sondra Marshak and Myrna Culbreath’s The Price of the Phoenix. Again, featuring cover art by Bob Larkin.

So, who was the death stalking the corridors of the Enterprise?
Asked by Anonymous

(Cosplay by Nephtis)

Front and back covers for the first printing of Death’s Angel, the last Bantam-published Star Trek novel, released in April of 1981. The cover painting was by Bob Larkin, a noted illustrator most famous for his work on covers for Marvel’s magazine-format comics such as Planet of the Apes and The Deadly Hands of Kung-Fu.

An ad from Starlog 13.

An ad from Starlog 13.

As a marketing tie-in with Paramount, Rainbo Bread (along with three other brands: Colonial, Kilpatrick and Manor) issued a condensed version of the Topps trading cards for Star Trek: The Motion Picture. With every loaf of bread you bought, you got a random card. To get a whole set, you had to buy 33 loaves of bread and be very lucky. Thankfully, whole sets occasionally pop up on eBay and at dealer’s tables at conventions.

The bakery cards are different from the Topps set in a few minor ways. The most obvious is that puzzle pieces are replaced with full cast shots or random factoids picked up from other Topps cards that weren’t included in the set.

(I won’t scan the whole set; there’s just not that much that’s interesting about them outside of the branding. Also: scanning trading cards is annoying and tiresome, even with Photoshop’s “Crop and Straighten” function. Yes, I know how much of a whiner that makes me. You can see them all here if you’re super-interested.)

This bit from “Turnabout Intruder” was the final scene shot for Star Trek. If NBC had taken the option to film two more episodes, the twenty-sixth would have been directed by William Shatner. Instead, the crew was actually dismantling sets that weren’t being used while the last episode was filming.