They Boldly Went is a tumblr dedicated to Star Trek: The Original Series, featuring photos, videos, art, books, reference material, comics and very (very) occasional looks at the reimagining helmed by J.J. Abrams and company. We welcome questions and do our best to answer them.

It is maintained by Kevin Church, who writes comics, occasionally talks about other people's work, takes pictures and does internet marketing for hire.

He is on Twitter (and Facebook, but he doesn't particularly like it, so don't stalk him.)

In addition to They Boldly Went, Kevin also maintains the Agreeable Comics tumblr, which acts as an adjunct to his small publishing concern and Disco Potential, which focuses on disco, house and synthpop music.

If you enjoy this blog, you may wish to check out Boldly Gone, an irregularly-updated Star Trek webcomic, written by Kevin and drawn by Bruce McCorkindale.

(Yes, Kevin likes talking about himself in the third person.)
A publicity photo from “Miri.”
18-year-old Kim Darby played the title character (who’s actually 14) after three years of working on shows such as Dr. Kildare and The Fugitive. She would later work with James Doohan in Bus Riley’s Back In Town (1965) and The People, a sci-fi flick starring William Shatner in 1972, but her most notable work is True Grit, where she took second billing to John Wayne.

A publicity photo from “Miri.”

18-year-old Kim Darby played the title character (who’s actually 14) after three years of working on shows such as Dr. Kildare and The Fugitive. She would later work with James Doohan in Bus Riley’s Back In Town (1965) and The People, a sci-fi flick starring William Shatner in 1972, but her most notable work is True Grit, where she took second billing to John Wayne.

Season 2 publicity photo featuring William Shatner giving you the bedroom eyes while the Enterprise averts her gaze.

Season 2 publicity photo featuring William Shatner giving you the bedroom eyes while the Enterprise averts her gaze.

Another second season publicity photo, featuring Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner as Spock and Captain James T. Kirk.

Another second season publicity photo, featuring Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner as Spock and Captain James T. Kirk.

A UK print ad for the Titan Books reprints of Bantam’s Star Trek novels from the 1960s and 1970s.

A UK print ad for the Titan Books reprints of Bantam’s Star Trek novels from the 1960s and 1970s.

I very rarely post fan art on this Tumblr, but sometimes you see something so unexplainable that you need to share it. This is one of those things.

I very rarely post fan art on this Tumblr, but sometimes you see something so unexplainable that you need to share it. This is one of those things.

A publicity photo from Season 2.

A publicity photo from Season 2.

A publicity photo and accompanying note from “The Menagerie.”

  • 388 Plays

The version of the Star Trek opening theme used in “The Man Trap” and “The Naked Time” both feature the electric violin as the main melodic element, replacing the soprano vocals. Alexander Courage conducted this version himself on August 19, 1966, during the scoring sessions for “The Man Trap.”

While the blu-ray release of The Original Series are sublime, the complete replacement of every episode’s theme with a re-recorded version seems to be a bit short-sighted. Iterations of the theme (such as the version featuring a cello section used on “Charlie X”) are part of Star Trek's history and should be preserved. Thankfully, there is a (limited-edition) box set that features all the music from the series.

If you never read it, I previously wrote quite a bit about how Roddenberry railroaded Courage over the theme music. I’m quite proud of that blog post, so, you know. Click if you want.

A publicity photo from Season 2. I’m at least 80% sure I’ve run this one before but a cursory glance at this blog’s archive page didn’t reveal anything. We can all agree it’s worth looking at again, though, right? DeForest Kelley being all cool doctor bro with his space prescription pad while Shatner looks slightly surprised.

A publicity photo from Season 2. I’m at least 80% sure I’ve run this one before but a cursory glance at this blog’s archive page didn’t reveal anything. We can all agree it’s worth looking at again, though, right? DeForest Kelley being all cool doctor bro with his space prescription pad while Shatner looks slightly surprised.

Amazon has the 16-inch Diamond Select U.S.S. Enterprise for just $44 right now. This screen-accurate toy is based on the computer models used for the remastered version of the series and features two things that make it amazing: lights and sounds. We all need more light and sound in our lives, don’t you agree?

Amazon has the 16-inch Diamond Select U.S.S. Enterprise for just $44 right now. This screen-accurate toy is based on the computer models used for the remastered version of the series and features two things that make it amazing: lights and sounds. We all need more light and sound in our lives, don’t you agree?

The cast and crew of Star Trek IV assemble for a group shot.

The cast and crew of Star Trek IV assemble for a group shot.

Two photos from the same day of filming Star Trek III: The Search For Spock. The first shows Nimoy speaking to Phil Morris and an uncredited cast member while the second features Star Trek II director Nicholas Meyer posing with his successor.

Bruce Logan, Richard Taylor, Gene Rodenberry, Mike Lawler, an unknown person and Kerry Melcher all inspect a detail panel from the Enterprise during the filming of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Taylor was the visual effects supervisor on the film, a task that  would be extremely challenging with the tight deadline that Paramount had set for the finished production. There’s a terrific interview with him at Beyond The Marquee.

Bruce Logan, Richard Taylor, Gene Rodenberry, Mike Lawler, an unknown person and Kerry Melcher all inspect a detail panel from the Enterprise during the filming of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Taylor was the visual effects supervisor on the film, a task that would be extremely challenging with the tight deadline that Paramount had set for the finished production. There’s a terrific interview with him at Beyond The Marquee.

Harve Bennett talks to Leonard Nimoy on the set of Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

Harve Bennett talks to Leonard Nimoy on the set of Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

Matt Jeffries’ original concept sketches for the Enterprise's bridge and Captain Pike's quarters.