They Boldly Went is a tumblr dedicated to Star Trek: The Original Series, featuring photos, videos, art, books, reference material, comics and very (very) occasional looks at the reimagining helmed by J.J. Abrams and company. We welcome questions and do our best to answer them.

It is maintained by Kevin Church, who writes comics, occasionally talks about other people's work, takes pictures and does internet marketing for hire.

He is on Twitter (and Facebook, but he doesn't particularly like it, so don't stalk him.)

In addition to They Boldly Went, Kevin also maintains the Agreeable Comics tumblr, which acts as an adjunct to his small publishing concern and Disco Potential, which focuses on disco, house and synthpop music.

If you enjoy this blog, you may wish to check out Boldly Gone, an irregularly-updated Star Trek webcomic, written by Kevin and drawn by Bruce McCorkindale.

(Yes, Kevin likes talking about himself in the third person.)
Amazon has the 16-inch Diamond Select U.S.S. Enterprise for just $44 right now. This screen-accurate toy is based on the computer models used for the remastered version of the series and features two things that make it amazing: lights and sounds. We all need more light and sound in our lives, don’t you agree?

Amazon has the 16-inch Diamond Select U.S.S. Enterprise for just $44 right now. This screen-accurate toy is based on the computer models used for the remastered version of the series and features two things that make it amazing: lights and sounds. We all need more light and sound in our lives, don’t you agree?

The cast and crew of Star Trek IV assemble for a group shot.

The cast and crew of Star Trek IV assemble for a group shot.

Two photos from the same day of filming Star Trek III: The Search For Spock. The first shows Nimoy speaking to Phil Morris and an uncredited cast member while the second features Star Trek II director Nicholas Meyer posing with his successor.

Bruce Logan, Richard Taylor, Gene Rodenberry, Mike Lawler, an unknown person and Kerry Melcher all inspect a detail panel from the Enterprise during the filming of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Taylor was the visual effects supervisor on the film, a task that  would be extremely challenging with the tight deadline that Paramount had set for the finished production. There’s a terrific interview with him at Beyond The Marquee.

Bruce Logan, Richard Taylor, Gene Rodenberry, Mike Lawler, an unknown person and Kerry Melcher all inspect a detail panel from the Enterprise during the filming of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Taylor was the visual effects supervisor on the film, a task that would be extremely challenging with the tight deadline that Paramount had set for the finished production. There’s a terrific interview with him at Beyond The Marquee.

Harve Bennett talks to Leonard Nimoy on the set of Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

Harve Bennett talks to Leonard Nimoy on the set of Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

Matt Jeffries’ original concept sketches for the Enterprise's bridge and Captain Pike's quarters.

lobbycards:

Star Trek: The Motion Picture, German lobby card. West German theatrical release 1980
Submitted by Dieter

lobbycards:

Star Trek: The Motion Picture, German lobby card. West German theatrical release 1980

Submitted by Dieter

A preproduction sketch by Mike Minor from “In Thy Image,” which was set to be the pilot episode for Star Trek: Phase II. While that series (which was itself an attempt to salvage the original aborted Trek movie) never happened, many of the ideas and designs for it were integrated into Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

A preproduction sketch by Mike Minor from “In Thy Image,” which was set to be the pilot episode for Star Trek: Phase II. While that series (which was itself an attempt to salvage the original aborted Trek movie) never happened, many of the ideas and designs for it were integrated into Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

Matt Jeffries and crew put together the helm station before the filming of “Where No Man Has Gone Before.” Along with most of the rest of the bridge, the original had been disassembled and/or destroyed after the network passed on “The Cage” and needed to be reassembled and/or replaced.

Matt Jeffries and crew put together the helm station before the filming of “Where No Man Has Gone Before.” Along with most of the rest of the bridge, the original had been disassembled and/or destroyed after the network passed on “The Cage” and needed to be reassembled and/or replaced.

I really don’t know why I don’t have a million followers at this point.

I really don’t know why I don’t have a million followers at this point.

Behind-the-scenes photos from Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan, from The Papers of Nicholas Meyer Collection currently held in the Special Collections Department at the University of Iowa Library in Iowa City.

The Howard Anderson Company was responsible for filming the special effects for “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” trying to bring cinematic-quality visual effects to television. They filmed the stationary 11-foot model of the Enterprise in front of a blue screen using a camera dolly on metal tracks. In an era before motion control photography was possible, Howard Anderson Jr and team would position the ship and inch slowly towards it, shooting one frame at a time. 

To complicate matters, the lighting rig needed to show the ship properly was prone to overheating the model. That meant that they had shoot a few frames, turn off the lights for twenty minutes or so, turn the lights on, expose a few more frames of film and then turn the lights off, ad nauseum. Nowadays, cold lights and fiber optics means that it’s much easier to shoot models, when models are even shot.

The Howard Anderson Company was responsible for filming the special effects for “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” trying to bring cinematic-quality visual effects to television. They filmed the stationary 11-foot model of the Enterprise in front of a blue screen using a camera dolly on metal tracks. In an era before motion control photography was possible, Howard Anderson Jr and team would position the ship and inch slowly towards it, shooting one frame at a time.

To complicate matters, the lighting rig needed to show the ship properly was prone to overheating the model. That meant that they had shoot a few frames, turn off the lights for twenty minutes or so, turn the lights on, expose a few more frames of film and then turn the lights off, ad nauseum. Nowadays, cold lights and fiber optics means that it’s much easier to shoot models, when models are even shot.

Flyer for the Boston Star Trek Association, circa 1986, that was part of a 20th Anniversary Convention packet I received recently. I’ll be posting the whole thing when I have a couple hours to scan it and clean it up nicely.

Flyer for the Boston Star Trek Association, circa 1986, that was part of a 20th Anniversary Convention packet I received recently. I’ll be posting the whole thing when I have a couple hours to scan it and clean it up nicely.

Lobby cards, Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

A behind-the-scenes photo from the first day of filming for “Where No Man Has Gone Before.”

Roddenberry had wanted James Goldstone (a highly-regarded TV director with stints on Perry Mason, Rawhide, The Fugitive along with Roddenberry’s own The Lieutenant) to helm the first pilot, but wasn’t able to secure him. After all, a man who had a good reputation could have it destroyed with one lousy pilot and like the rest of Hollywood, he was a bit skittish about science-fiction at the time. (That said, he was happy to recommend his friend Robert H. Justman as an Associate Producer for the show early on, which worked out very well indeed.)

When NBC told Roddenberry he would have a second shot, he again approached Goldstone, who agreed to direct the second pilot.

"There had been several problems with the "The Cage." One of them was that it cost so much money and the other that it took so long to shoot," Goldstone said in an interview. "One of the requisites put on the second pilot was to shoot it in eight days which would then prove that a weekly series could be done in six or seven days. The other requisite was that NBC very much wanted something that could be ‘commercial’ against the police shows and all the other action things that were then on television. "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was not so much a pilot as it was an example of how we could go on a weekly level."

A behind-the-scenes photo from the first day of filming for “Where No Man Has Gone Before.”

Roddenberry had wanted James Goldstone (a highly-regarded TV director with stints on Perry Mason, Rawhide, The Fugitive along with Roddenberry’s own The Lieutenant) to helm the first pilot, but wasn’t able to secure him. After all, a man who had a good reputation could have it destroyed with one lousy pilot and like the rest of Hollywood, he was a bit skittish about science-fiction at the time. (That said, he was happy to recommend his friend Robert H. Justman as an Associate Producer for the show early on, which worked out very well indeed.)

When NBC told Roddenberry he would have a second shot, he again approached Goldstone, who agreed to direct the second pilot.

"There had been several problems with the "The Cage." One of them was that it cost so much money and the other that it took so long to shoot," Goldstone said in an interview. "One of the requisites put on the second pilot was to shoot it in eight days which would then prove that a weekly series could be done in six or seven days. The other requisite was that NBC very much wanted something that could be ‘commercial’ against the police shows and all the other action things that were then on television. "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was not so much a pilot as it was an example of how we could go on a weekly level."