They Boldly Went is a tumblr dedicated to Star Trek: The Original Series, featuring photos, videos, art, books, reference material, comics and very (very) occasional looks at the reimagining helmed by J.J. Abrams and company. We welcome questions and do our best to answer them.

It is maintained by Kevin Church, who writes comics, occasionally talks about other people's work, takes pictures and does internet marketing for hire.

He is on Twitter (and Facebook, but he doesn't particularly like it, so don't stalk him.)

In addition to They Boldly Went, Kevin also maintains the Agreeable Comics tumblr, which acts as an adjunct to his small publishing concern and Disco Potential, which focuses on disco, house and synthpop music.

If you enjoy this blog, you may wish to check out Boldly Gone, an irregularly-updated Star Trek webcomic, written by Kevin and drawn by Bruce McCorkindale.

(Yes, Kevin likes talking about himself in the third person.)
In November of 1980, Bennett wrote his first outline for a Star Trek sequel, War of the Generations. While en route to a rebellion on a Federation world, the Enterprise rescues a woman that Admiral Kirk had once been in love with and discovers that their son (whom he had no idea existed) was one of the rebel leaders. He arrives at the planet and is promptly captured and sentenced to death by his progeny before the audience learns that the mastermind behind the whole planetary conflagration is Khan.

Once Khan’s identity and motives are revealed, Kirk and his son team up against the genetically augmented leader and after defeating him, the younger man joins the crew of the Enterprise. 

While War of the Generations bears almost no resemblance to the final movie, some themes and elements were carried through multiple drafts: Kirk met a son he never knew, Spock was preoccupied with death and McCoy had feelings for a younger woman — someone who had made it clear that she was also interested in the doctor.

In November of 1980, Bennett wrote his first outline for a Star Trek sequel, War of the Generations. While en route to a rebellion on a Federation world, the Enterprise rescues a woman that Admiral Kirk had once been in love with and discovers that their son (whom he had no idea existed) was one of the rebel leaders. He arrives at the planet and is promptly captured and sentenced to death by his progeny before the audience learns that the mastermind behind the whole planetary conflagration is Khan.

Once Khan’s identity and motives are revealed, Kirk and his son team up against the genetically augmented leader and after defeating him, the younger man joins the crew of the Enterprise.

While War of the Generations bears almost no resemblance to the final movie, some themes and elements were carried through multiple drafts: Kirk met a son he never knew, Spock was preoccupied with death and McCoy had feelings for a younger woman — someone who had made it clear that she was also interested in the doctor.

theamazingindi:

'You need to read YOUR manga dude!' replied william shatner 

I don’t even know.

theamazingindi:

'You need to read YOUR manga dude!' replied william shatner 

I don’t even know.

(Source: anarcho-groke)

After Paramount Pictures rejected Gene Roddenberry’s initial proposal for Star Trek II (in which the Enterprise crew went back in time to ensure that John F. Kennedy’s assassination was not foiled by Klingons), the Great Bird was relegated to the rule of “executive consultant” and Paramount TV executive producer Harve Bennett was called in to right the ship. He was given an initial budget of just over $11m (around a third of what Star Trek: The Motion Picture's original budget had been) and told that there needed to be a Star Trek movie in theaters in the summer of 1982. In addition to the budget, though, Bennett had another consideration: despite making a ton of money, Star Trek: The Motion Picture was not viewed as very Trek by many fans and Paramount staffers and he was under instruction bring back some of the magic of the original series to the films.

The only problem with that was that he’d never seen an episode of Star Trek and his first exposure to the franchise had been the first movie, which he thought was ponderous and boring. He made up for this by getting a screening room on the Paramount lot and working his way through the series. That’s where he was introduced to Khan Noonien Singh and found something he felt the first movie had lacked and needed desperately: a villain.

Now he had to come up with the rest of the movie.

After Paramount Pictures rejected Gene Roddenberry’s initial proposal for Star Trek II (in which the Enterprise crew went back in time to ensure that John F. Kennedy’s assassination was not foiled by Klingons), the Great Bird was relegated to the rule of “executive consultant” and Paramount TV executive producer Harve Bennett was called in to right the ship. He was given an initial budget of just over $11m (around a third of what Star Trek: The Motion Picture's original budget had been) and told that there needed to be a Star Trek movie in theaters in the summer of 1982. In addition to the budget, though, Bennett had another consideration: despite making a ton of money, Star Trek: The Motion Picture was not viewed as very Trek by many fans and Paramount staffers and he was under instruction bring back some of the magic of the original series to the films.

The only problem with that was that he’d never seen an episode of Star Trek and his first exposure to the franchise had been the first movie, which he thought was ponderous and boring. He made up for this by getting a screening room on the Paramount lot and working his way through the series. That’s where he was introduced to Khan Noonien Singh and found something he felt the first movie had lacked and needed desperately: a villain.

Now he had to come up with the rest of the movie.

Hi, uhmm I was wondering if you could tell me what those weird package sort of belt things were that were on the uniforms in the motion picture and what they did? Because I still haven't figured it out hah

They’re medical sensors known as Perscans!

(This was taken from the Sunday, April 13, 1980 installment of the Star Trek newspaper strip, written and drawn by Thomas Warkentin. It was previously featured on this Tumblr here.)

On finishing Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Douglas Trumball told Cinefex's Don Shay: "Oh, I think we surpassed what I expected to achieve by quite a margin. I felt that coming in with the amount of time we had and the amount of work that needed to be done, the major thrust had to be toward just saving it. The big question was never whether or not it was going to be good; but rather whether or not we were even going to have a picture to release."
For more shots of Trumbull and his team at work, check out this post.

On finishing Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Douglas Trumball told Cinefex's Don Shay: "Oh, I think we surpassed what I expected to achieve by quite a margin. I felt that coming in with the amount of time we had and the amount of work that needed to be done, the major thrust had to be toward just saving it. The big question was never whether or not it was going to be good; but rather whether or not we were even going to have a picture to release."

For more shots of Trumbull and his team at work, check out this post.

(Source: trekcore.com)

Taking a few days away from this Tumblr. Nobody get into any trouble while I’m gone.

Taking a few days away from this Tumblr. Nobody get into any trouble while I’m gone.

Reader Alexander was kind enough to send over the cover and interior illustrations for the German edition of Star Trek: Mission To Horatius, which was published in 1970, three years before the show actually aired in the country. As nobody had seen the program (or had been given any kind of reference material), the illustrators were left to their own devices and came up with a radically different interpretation of our favorite science fiction franchise.

Hailing Frequencies Are Open! Ask Trek Questions, Get Answers!


The communications officer is standing by for our regular Friday feature, Hailing Frequencies Open. Just use the Tumblr Ask function and send in your Star Trek questions, commentary, etc! I’ll pick the best of the bunch and respond to them!

Before you write in, though, you might want to check out the Trek Answers archive to see if your query has been addressed already!

The Starship Boobyprize by Eleri Mai Harris was practically made for me and after I picked it up at last week’s MICE event, I emailed her and begged for the chance to run it on this tumblr. She was kind enough to agree and so here it is. I’m pretty sure you’ll all like it as much as I did.

Want to support the creator and get a copy of your own? Buy it here.

Star Trek was the only one of the 40 movies directed by Robert Wise that didn’t get any kind of sneak preview. On the commentary for the director’s cut of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, he describes that the special effects for the film were so late that he literally took the first completed print of the film to the world premiere at at the Smithsonian Institute on December 6,1979. After the premiere, Wise and Roddenberry wanted to do some more work on the film but were vetoed by Paramount executives, who said that it would show a “lack of confidence” in the movie.

If you haven’t gotten a chance to see Wise’s cut of the film, released on DVD in 2001, it’s definitely worth a viewing. The second half of the movie is significantly tightened up through some editing and the new special effects help greatly with the storytelling. It has still not been released on Blu-Ray due to the new special effects being mastered at 480p, but can be found on Amazon.

startrekships:

Oberth-class starship model by Jay Barnes

Wow.

What was his status when he was witness to Kodos The Executioner's crime?
Asked by 52inakangol

He was a teen. A space teen. (“Conscience of the King”)

But was Kirk a science officer? Security? Tactical? Engineering? Helmsman?
Asked by Anonymous

Jim Kirk worked with Ben Finney in Engineering on board the Republic (“Court Martial”), but I imagine (which means “I am making it up with no real evidence”) that command-track officers work in multiple disciplines on Starfleet vessels in order to familiarize themselves with operations.

In order to assure continuity in the actors’ actions, the production team of Star Trek: The Motion Picture created a “Flight Manual” for the cast, explaining how the various controls on the ship were supposed to work. You can see the whole thing at Cygnus-x1.net.