They Boldly Went is a tumblr dedicated to Star Trek: The Original Series, featuring photos, videos, art, books, reference material, comics and very (very) occasional looks at the reimagining helmed by J.J. Abrams and company. We welcome questions and do our best to answer them.

It is maintained by Kevin Church, who writes comics, occasionally talks about other people's work, takes pictures and does internet marketing for hire.

He is on Twitter (and Facebook, but he doesn't particularly like it, so don't stalk him.)

In addition to They Boldly Went, Kevin also maintains the Agreeable Comics tumblr, which acts as an adjunct to his small publishing concern and Disco Potential, which focuses on disco, house and synthpop music.

If you enjoy this blog, you may wish to check out Boldly Gone, an irregularly-updated Star Trek webcomic, written by Kevin and drawn by Bruce McCorkindale.

(Yes, Kevin likes talking about himself in the third person.)

Here are two facts about Gorgan in “And The Children Shall Lead.”

Fact 01: He was played by noted criminal defense and personal injury attorney Melvin Belli, the man who defended Jack Ruby and came up with the idea of “day in the life” films for plaintiffs in personal injury cases. His son Caesar played one of the titular kids and series producer Fred Freiberger hoped that the presence of the famous attorney would boost ratings.

Fact 02: Fred Freiberger was wrong.

This clip from “The Gamesters of Triskelion” probably explains a lot about why I had trouble with the opposite sex for the first two decades of my life.

Thanks to tight budgeting from NBC, “The Paradise Syndrome” was one of only two episodes from Star Trek's third season that featured outdoor shooting. “All Our Yesterdays” was the other, with a sword fight in the street.

In the book Star Trek Lives!, D.C. Fontana went into detail about how they decided to portray Spock’s interactions with the Romulan commander in “The Enterprise Incident.” The original shooting version of the script described Spock as “raining kisses on every square inch above the shoulder,” but Nimoy and guest star Joanna Linville thought this seemed out of character. Nimoy went so far as to write a letter to Roddenberry’s office complaining  about this and Fontana backed up his opinion. She, director John Meredyth Lucas and the actors came up with the restrained, alien approach to the lovemaking scene.

Of course, fans flooded Fontana’s office with complaints about how Vulcans should only have sex every seven years. That’s why she included sex scenes featuring Spock in Vulcan’s Glory, establishing that pon farr and sexuality were connected but distinct.

In the book Star Trek Lives!, D.C. Fontana went into detail about how they decided to portray Spock’s interactions with the Romulan commander in “The Enterprise Incident.” The original shooting version of the script described Spock as “raining kisses on every square inch above the shoulder,” but Nimoy and guest star Joanna Linville thought this seemed out of character. Nimoy went so far as to write a letter to Roddenberry’s office complaining about this and Fontana backed up his opinion. She, director John Meredyth Lucas and the actors came up with the restrained, alien approach to the lovemaking scene.

Of course, fans flooded Fontana’s office with complaints about how Vulcans should only have sex every seven years. That’s why she included sex scenes featuring Spock in Vulcan’s Glory, establishing that pon farr and sexuality were connected but distinct.

"We bet you never saw this one coming. IDW Publishing and BOOM! Studios are joining forces to present the crossover comic book event of the year: Star Trek/Planet of the Apes “

Well, well, well. This actually makes a lot of sense and I’m surprised I haven’t already written fanfiction about this a hundred times before.

"We bet you never saw this one coming. IDW Publishing and BOOM! Studios are joining forces to present the crossover comic book event of the year: Star Trek/Planet of the Apes

Well, well, well. This actually makes a lot of sense and I’m surprised I haven’t already written fanfiction about this a hundred times before.

A MeFi thread about Galaxy Quest linked to an oral history of the making of the film. Watched it again and it really holds up. One thing I learned--Alec Baldwin originally read for the Tim Allen role! So between that, the Abrams reboot, and Scalzi's Redshirts, is it just me or are people almost more interested in the meta-narrative than the actual show anymore?
Asked by doughanke

I didn’t know that about Alec Baldwin! That would have been amazing, even if T. Allen did a good job.

Anyway, I don’t know that the metanarrative is as attractive to the majority of fans as the idea that they are fans, if that makes any sense. They like their own world-building, slash and fanfic of it more than they could ever enjoy a single episode of Star Trek. And that’s okay.

(Hailing frequencies are open today, so if you have questions about Star Trek, ask questions about Star Trek!)

Hailing Frequences Are Open! Ask Trek Questions!


The communications officer is standing by for our regular Friday feature, Hailing Frequencies Open. Just use the Tumblr Ask function and send in your Star Trek questions, commentary, etc! I’ll pick the best of the bunch and respond to them!

Before you write in, though, you might want to check out the Trek Answers archive to see if your query has been addressed already!

"Spock’s Brain" was the first episode of Star Trek's third season. It was also the last one directed by Marc Daniels, who had directed fourteen previous installments, including “The Man Trap,” “The Doomsday Machine” and “Space Seed,” He would later write the Star Trek: The Animated Series episode “One Of Our Planets Is Missing.”

Dr. Leonard McCoy by Kyle Starks. I got this as a bonus when I contributed to the Kickstarter for the funny, surprisingly moving 80s movie pastiche Sexcastle, which you can now order.

Dr. Leonard McCoy by Kyle Starks. I got this as a bonus when I contributed to the Kickstarter for the funny, surprisingly moving 80s movie pastiche Sexcastle, which you can now order.

allisontype:

OMG! How great is this Star Trek bonnet by @PennyStarrJr?!!
Amazing!
Get thee to her Etsy store pronto! Engage!

allisontype:

OMG! How great is this Star Trek bonnet by @PennyStarrJr?!!

Amazing!

Get thee to her Etsy store pronto! Engage!

In the briefing room scene near the end of the first act of “Assignment Earth,” Spock says: "There will be an important assassination today, an equally dangerous government coup in Asia, and, this could be highly critical, the launching of an orbital nuclear warhead platform by the United States, countering a similar launch by other powers."

"Assignment Earth" was first aired on March 29, 1968. Six days later, Martin Luther King, Jr was assassinated by James Earl Ray. On that same day (April 4, 1968), NASA launched the unmanned Apollo 6 rocket, which suffered a serious mishap in flight and flew wildly off-course, just like the Saturn V featured in the episode.

thisistheverge:

Morning boot up

thisistheverge:

Morning boot up

(Source: generic-art)

Re: post/92141912555 I'm monosexual but I know there's a hell of a lot more to LGBPQA+ rights than rights for gay people. And trans people ARE born the gender we ID as. Same as cis people.

I’m sorry I didn’t phrase things in a manner clear enough for you to understand than I am 100% for human rights in every way, shape, form and fashion. Honestly, the language and semantics around gender and the like are an entirely-new minefield for me to navigate and I’m sorry if I’ve offended anyone by not being inclusive or by using incorrect terminology.

Do you think that if Trek were to transition back to Television that if they would amend their portrayal of sexuality and gender? While being ground breaking at the time, Trek's treatment of women was still highly questionable. The lack of questioning Janeway's commands make her seem like a despot at time. Trek treated nearly everyone as being bipolar (M/F) in regards to gender. There were no homosexual characters, though there were actors! (Takei Rocks!)
Asked by albdamned

The simple answer is: yes.

The slightly more complex answer is: yes and I hope it’s not an issue at all in the show. If a member of the crew is trans, great, that’s not the story. If a member of the crew was queer, great, that’s not the story. The story can involve the way the love, their gender, etc, but it shouldn’t be any more of an issue in the day-to-day operation of a starship than whether or not someone is black or has green blood.

Don’t get me wrong; I don’t want marginalization, but I do hope that by 2260 or whenever, we’re not making what a person is the point story, but who they are and what they do. We’ve been making remarkable strides in the last decade for gay rights, despite the screeching of a very vocal minority, and it looks like trans rights are the next big step for us. By the time James T. Kirk sits it the center seat, it shouldn’t matter whether or not anyone on the bridge was born with the gender they currently have.

(It should be noted that I am a cis hetero white male so I should probably be told to shut the fuck up when it comes to deciding how people should be portrayed on TV.)

Hailing frequencies are open today, so ask questions, get answers!

I'm not sure if you've done this before, but can you do a post showing all the different trek uniform patches?
Asked by Anonymous